When we nurture connection, we find that we lose and gain. What we gain is the realization that we are united in creating and sharing a life that holds all that we value, that holds our purpose and dreams. What we lose is separation, loss and a sense of disconnection. Few pursuits, few creations, few projects achieve this connection better than gardening.

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Henry Thoreau, in his essay, Walking, said,

“Here is the vast, savage, howling mother of ours. Nature lying all around, with such beauty, and such affection for her children, as the leopard; and yet we are so early weaned from her breast to society, to that culture which is exclusively an interaction of man on man.”

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It’s not that we have to prove something; grow the biggest, the most perfect or the most abundant crops. It’s not that every weed needs to be pulled and every snail re-settled in a new home. It’s not a drive to achieve perfection. The world probably has an over-abundance of showplaces. It’s a movement in the direction of growth, of nurturing, of producing, of creating and of sharing the journey. It’s an immersion into the rhythms of life, the creative process and the connection to the diversity, the abundance and the mystery of nature.

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We tend to get reconditioned away from our natural affinity toward nature and lose what is such a profound part of us. In our garden, Nature is showing us how life lives and dies, thrives and withers. It is our teacher and our companion and our mentor. In the end, we discover that Nature is our other mother and that she is intrinsically connected to us.

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